Home / Plant Based Supplements / 10 Best Nettle Supplements – Reviewed & Ranked for 2017
Please Note: We are compensated if you buy anything through the links in this article.
Best Nettle Supplements

10 Best Nettle Supplements – Reviewed & Ranked for 2017

If you’re looking for the best nettle supplements to buy this year, then you’ve come to the right place

You can also get more info by jumping to our Nettle Supplements Guide.

Top 10 Nettle Supplements

#1 Nature's Way Nettle Leaf S Nature’s Way Nettle Leaf More Info
#2 Swanson Stinging Nettle Root S Swanson Stinging Nettle Root More Info
#3 Now Foods Nettle Root Extract S Now Foods Nettle Root Extract More Info
#4 Oregon's Wild Harvest Nettle S Oregon’s Wild Harvest Nettle More Info
#5 Pure Mountain Botanicals Full Spectrum Nettle Leaf S Pure Mountain Botanicals Full Spectrum Nettle Leaf More Info
#6 Gaia Herbs Nettle Leaf S Gaia Herbs Nettle Leaf More Info
#7 Eclectic Institution Nettles – Quercetin S Eclectic Institution Nettles – Quercetin More Info
#8 Solgar Standardized Full Potency Stinging Nettle Leaf Extract S Solgar Standardized Full Potency Stinging Nettle More Info
#9 Solaray Organic Nettle Leaves Supplement S Solaray Organic Nettle Leaves Supplement More Info
#10 Bulksupplements Pure Nettle Leaf Extract Powder S Bulksupplements Pure Nettle Leaf Extract Powder More Info

Nettle Supplements Guide


Nettle is short of “stinging nettle,” which is an herb that has a variety of both topical and internal uses. Nettle supplements can be taken as a tea, extract or capsule. This plant is also applied to the skin as a cream or ointment. Nettle supplements have many useful applications and few side effects. This herb has been used for a long time in traditional herbal medicine, as well as for food.

What is Nettle?

Stinging nettle is named for the characteristic sting of its leaves and stems, which hurt when touched by the skin. However, once harvested, stinging nettle is consumed as a food in addition to being used for medicine. Scientific research is now supporting what herbal practitioners have seen for many years, which is that this plant has a range of impressive benefits and can be used to treat specific conditions.

Stinging nettle is a flowering perennial. It’s been used in medicine as far back as Ancient Greece (https://draxe.com/stinging-nettle/). It blossoms in summer and produces pink or yellow flowers. Accidentally touching stinging nettle can cause redness, itching, swelling, pain or numbness of the affected area.

Stinging nettle is native to a few different areas of the world, namely Europe, Asia, northern Africa and western North America. However, it’s now commonly grown all around the world. It grows best in nitrogen-rich soils. This plant can also be found commonly growing in the wild.

Both the roots and tops of this plant are used medicinally. The leaves, stems and roots are used for various conditions. The tops of the plant are most commonly used medicinally, however. Different parts of this plant are used for different purposes.

Nettle leaves are used for hay fever, muscle pain, alopecia, eczema and other health issues. Nettle root is used mainly for enlarged prostate symptoms, but it’s also used to treat urinary problems such as UTIs.

In addition to being used for medicine, nettle leaves can be cooked or blanched and added to various foods. They’re a nutritious and tasty green.

Benefits of Nettle

Stinging nettle leaves are cooked and used as food. They’re included in soups and stews, among other dishes. The leaves are nutritious and rich in vitamin A, iron, magnesium, and calcium. They boost the immune system and detoxify the body.

Multiple parts of the plant are used for medicine. The tops of the plant are used, including the stems and leaves. Nettle root is also used medicinally.

Enlarged prostate: Nettle root is most commonly used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia, also known as an enlarged prostate. Nettle root is often combined with other complementary herbs to treat this condition.

Urinary tract infections: Nettle root can treat UTIs and alleviate the symptoms.

Treat muscle/joint pain: Nettle root can help alleviate muscle pain, though nettle leaf is more commonly used for reducing inflammation. Nettle leaves and stems can be applied to the skin for muscle aches and pains.

Hay fever: Nettle leaf is effective in reducing the unpleasant symptoms of hay fever or allergies.

Osteoarthritis: Nettle leaves have been shown to be effective in alleviating arthritis.

Insect bites: Stinging nettle can be applied topically to improve insect bites and stings.

Eczema: Eczema is applied to the skin and taken internally at the same time to reduce eczema symptoms.

Stop or reduce bleeding: Stinging nettle is used in products to reduce bleeding in various contexts. It can reduce bleeding after surgery, reduce internal bleeding, nosebleeds, bowel bleeding and uterine bleeding. It can also be used to reduce gum bleeding associated with gingivitis.

Hair loss: Ointments containing stinging nettle leaves and stems are applied to the skin to improve hair loss or alopecia.

Diuretic/laxative: Stinging nettle can also have a diuretic and/or laxative effect, and has often been used for cleansing the system. The root and leaf both have diuretic properties.

Are There Any Side Effects?

Touching raw stinging nettle leaves or stems will result in a negative skin reaction. This can include redness, swelling, itching or numbness. Always be careful when handling raw nettle or when harvesting this herb.

However, stinging nettle is usually safe to consume in regular medicinal doses. Some possible side effects include diarrhea or an upset stomach — keep in mind that this herb is used for its diuretic and laxative effects. You may also experience sweating or water retention.

Nettle also should not be used with certain other medications, as it can heighten their effects. Nettle can affect your blood’s ability to clot and lower your blood pressure, so it should not be taken with blood pressure medication or blood thinners. It may also increase the effects of non-steroid anti-inflammatories, diuretics and diabetes drugs.

Additionally, it can affect the menstrual cycle and should not be taken by pregnant women.

How to Take Nettle

Stinging nettle is available in a variety of forms, each of which may be appropriate for different circumstances. Keep in mind that stinging nettle leaves and root are used for quite different purposes, with small overlap. Thus, be careful to choose a nettle supplement that specifies the part of the plant that was used, and that is designed to treat your specific ailment.

For internal use, nettle is available as fresh or dried leaves, found in specialty health stores or gardens. These leaves can be used to make a tea or extracted at home. Nettle leaf tea is used to treat hay fever, inflammatory illnesses and a variety of other issues.

Nettle leaves are also processed and extracted into a liquid form or tincture. This is one way to get a more concentrated form of the herb in a smaller liquid dose.

Additionally, nettle is available in the form of capsule supplements. This is a more convenient form, since it can be easily carried and consumed anywhere. Additionally, supplements have the benefit of specifying the exact amount of herb in each capsule, so you can precisely monitor your intake.

Most health or supplement stores should have stinging nettle supplements in stock; they are easier to find than the fresh leaves. However, you must still be careful that your supplement contains the right part of the plant.

Stinging nettle is also used for various topical applications. You can buy nettle as a topical ointment or cream that’s designed to be applied directly to the skin. It’s used for joint pain, eczema and hair loss, as well as for insect bites.

There is no universal dose recommendation for stinging nettle. It depends on the condition being targetted as well as the user’s age and health. Thus, make sure to use the dosing instructions on your supplement as a guideline. Consult with a professional practitioner before experimenting with doses with a new herb. Make sure to buy a product with specific dose and ingredient information, particularly if you are new to using this plant.

What to Look for in a Good Nettle Supplement

Nettle supplements should be made with whole, raw stinging nettle. Carefully read the label of any nettle supplement before buying and consuming/applying it.

A high-quality nettle supplement will contain information about the source of the herb, including whether it’s organic or naturally-grown. Herbs grown without the use of pesticides or artificial fertilizers are always preferable, since they are more pure and less likely to contain environmental contaminants. However, cost is also a concern, as organic supplements often cost more than conventional ones.

It’s also important that the supplement does not contain any fillers or unnecessary ingredients. Some supplement companies mislead customers by not accurately representing how much of the active herb is in each dose, so look for specific numbers on the label. Avoid products with lengthy and obscure ingredient lists.

Lastly, it’s always helpful to buy from companies with good reviews and good reputations. Do research before buying from a new company, and ensure that it meets good manufacturing practices and has sufficient quality control.

Note: Always speak with your doctor before taking any supplements featured on this website. This article has not been written, reviewed or endorsed by a medical professional and may not be used to diagnose or treat any medical conditions.