Home / Vitamins & Minerals / 10 Best Chromium Supplements – Ranked & Reviewed for 2018
Please Note: We are compensated if you buy anything through the links in this article.
best-Chromium-supplements

10 Best Chromium Supplements – Ranked & Reviewed for 2018

If you’re looking for the best chromium supplements to buy this year, then you’ve come to the right place

You can also get more info by jumping to our Chromium Supplements Guide.

Top 10 Chromium Supplements

If you buy anything using the links below, we get a commission.

#1 Thorne-Research-Chromium-Picolinate-s Thorne Research Chromium Picolinate More Info
#2 BlueBonnet-Chromium-Picolinate-s BlueBonnet Chromium Picolinate More Info
#3 New-Chapter-GTF-Chromium-Food-Complex-s New Chapter GTF Chromium Food Complex More Info
#4 Pure-Encapsulations-Chromium-s Pure Encapsulations Chromium More Info
#5 Country-Life-Chromium-Picolinate-s Country Life Chromium Picolinate More Info
#6 MegaFood-GTF-Chromium-s MegaFood GTF Chromium More Info
#7 Innate-Response-GTF-Chromium-s Innate Response GTF Chromium More Info
#8 Superior-Source-Chromium-Picolinate-s Superior Source Chromium Picolinate More Info
#9 NutraBio-Chelated-Chromium-GFT-s NutraBio Chelated Chromium GFT More Info
#10 nutrex-Lipo-6-Chromium-s Nutrex Lipo-6 Chromium More Info

Chromium Supplements Guide


What is Chromium?

Chromium is a naturally occurring element. It’s a hard metal that can be polished to a high shine, which is why it’s often used for plumbing fixtures and car grills and other trim. It is vital to health, but only in trace amounts. A human being only needs 20 parts of chromium per 1 billion parts of blood to maintain their health. Because the amount of chromium a human needs is so small and it is readily found in many foods, it is difficult to have a chromium deficiency. However, some people do suffer from chromium deficiency and may benefit from doctor directed supplementation.

A deficiency in chromium often comes about because the person eats plant foods that were grown in poor, chromium-deficient soil or eats a diet too high in refined carbohydrates, which causes the body to excrete the mineral. Stress and trauma also deplete chromium, and antacids make it hard for the body to absorb it. Interestingly, the United States is one of the few countries where chromium deficiency is of concern.

Foods that provide good amounts of chromium for healthy people are broccoli, whole wheat English muffins and whole wheat bread, orange juice, turkey breast, mashed potatoes, cubed beef and dried garlic. Chromium is found in hard water, or water that’s abundant in minerals.

There’s no RDA allowance for chromium (which is why you need to speak to a doctor before taking it).

Precautions

It’s very important that people who are taking supplemental chromium stay within the prescribed dose. Chromium is a toxic metal when taken in amounts even a little over the daily dietary intake range. The more common side effects are sleep disturbances, including insomnia, irritability, headache and moodiness. More serious side effects are clumsiness, mental confusion, inability to concentrate and symptoms that point to problems with the liver. These include jaundice, which is a yellowing of the skin or the whites of the eyes, dark urine, clay-colored stool, itching, fatigue and appetite loss. Other symptoms are pain in the upper abdomen and nausea. Excess chromium can damage the kidneys and nerves and lead to heart arrhythmias and hypoglycemia. But even these side effects are uncommon and are more likely to occur in people who handle chromium as part of their job.

Some drugs enhance or inhibit the absorption of chromium supplements. Drugs that impair the absorption of chromium and cause the body to excrete it are H2 blockers, proton pump inhibitors and corticosteroids as well as antacids. A person who takes a steroid such as prednisone may not be able to take chromium supplements. Interestingly, other types of corticosteroids help the body absorb chromium. Other drugs that help with chromium absorption are insulin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin and ibuprofen, drugs that inhibit prostaglandins, which are often NSAIDs, beta-blockers and niacin in its form of nicotinic acid. A buyer who is considering taking chromium supplements should consult with their physician if they are taking any of these drugs. People who are pregnant, breastfeeding, taking supplemental zinc, iron or vitamin C should also talk to their doctor if they’re thinking of taking chromium.

Always speak with a medical professional or doctor before taking any supplements. Always read the product label for instructions and directions.

Taking Chromium Supplements

Chromium supplements are sold as chromium picolinate, high-chromium yeast, chromium chloride, chromium nicotinate or chromium citrate. Chromium picolinate seems to be the most popular form and chromium chloride seems to be the most difficult form to absorb. They come in capsule, tablet or liquid-filled capsule form. The buyer should take them according to their doctor’s directions.

What to Look for in a Good Chromium Supplement

Even if the supplement isn’t prescribed by the doctor but will be bought over the counter, the buyer still needs to consult with their doctor before buying. Then, they should look for the highest quality supplement, and utilize resources such as the NIH’s Dietary Supplement Label Database. They should comparison shop at stores that specialize in vitamin and mineral supplements, and ask questions of the people who work there.

A person should read the label before buying a supplement. It should have the name and address of the manufacturer and the seal of approval from either the NSF International or US Pharmacopeia. The chromium supplements should be natural as opposed to synthetic and should be free of additives.

Important Notice: The information on supplementhound.com is intended for entertainment purposes only and and does not constitute professional, medical or healthcare advice or diagnosis, and may not be used as such. The information on this site is not written, reviewed or endorsed by a medical professional, and is only to be used at your own risk. Make sure to follow label instructions for whichever product you purchase. Supplementhound.com does not assume liability for any actions undertaken after reading this information, and does not assume liability if one misuses products featured on this website. Always consult your doctor before using any products you see on this website. The results may vary about any product effectiveness.