Home / Herbal Supplements / 10 Best Turmeric Supplements – Reviewed & Ranked for 2017
best-turmeric-supplements

10 Best Turmeric Supplements – Reviewed & Ranked for 2017

If you’re looking for the best turmeric supplements to buy this year, then you’ve come to the right place

You can also get more info by jumping to our Turmeric Supplements Guide.

Top 10 Turmeric Supplements

#1 Organic-India-Turmeric-Formula-s Organic India Turmeric Formula More Info
#2 New-Chapter-Turmeric-Force-s New Chapter Turmeric Force More Info
#3 Gaia-Herbs-Turmeric-Supreme-Extra-Strength-s Gaia Herbs Turmeric Supreme Extra Strength More Info
#4 MegaFood-Turmeric-Strength-For-Whole-Body-s MegaFood Turmeric Strength For Whole Body More Info
#5 Solgar-Standardized-Turmeric-Root-Extract-s Solgar Standardized Turmeric Root Extract More Info
#6 Source-Naturals-Turmeric-1000-s Source Naturals Turmeric 1000 More Info
#7 Solaray-Turmeric-Root-Extract-s Solaray Turmeric Root Extract More Info
#8 Oregons-Wild-Harvest-Turmeric-s Oregon’s Wild Harvest Turmeric More Info
#9 Bluebonnet-Nutrition-Standardized-Turmeric-Root-Extract-s Bluebonnet Nutrition Standardized Turmeric Root Extract More Info
#10 Natures-Answer-Turmeric-3-s Nature’s Answer Turmeric-3 More Info

Turmeric Supplements Guide


If you browse through a health food store nowadays, you’re likely to come across turmeric in all sorts of things — dinners, smoothies, and juices, to name a few. This bright yellow spice is commonly used in Indian cooking and healing, but it’s now making a name for itself in the West as well. Read on to discover why turmeric is so popular with health buffs.

What is Turmeric?

Turmeric is made from a plant of the same name. It’s in the ginger family, and the rhizomes look very similar, though the turmeric rhizome is yellow and smaller. Like ginger, this rhizome is the part of the plant that’s used for food and medicine. Not to be mistaken for a root, a rhizome is actually a part of the stem of the plant. It often grows horizontally, and it produces the roots below as well as shoots above. The rhizome is usually boiled, dried in the sun, and then ground into a powder for use.

Turmeric grows wild in South and Southeast Asian forests. It’s wild-harvested by people for use in traditional Indian medicine as well as Asian cooking. It has a signature bright yellow hue, particularly when ground into powder. This hue is used to dye Indian and Bangladeshi clothing, such as saris and Buddhist monk robes. Turmeric is one of the ingredients that gives Indian curry its familiar golden coloring. It has a warm and slightly bitter taste.

In traditional Indian medicine, turmeric is used for a variety of ailments both internal and external. It’s used for throat infections, colds, indigestion and liver ailments. It’s also used to treat stores and to cleanse wounds.

Turmeric is also used in Hindu ceremonies, and is considered a precious and holy herb. Many parts of India use turmeric (“haldi”) as a part of Hindu weddings, in which it’s used to dye the body yellow. Hindu monks’ robes were traditionally dyed with turmeric as well. Its golden color is associated with many aspects of traditional spirituality.

There is not a great deal of high-quality scientific evidence to support the medicinal effectiveness of turmeric. However, this plant has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years. It’s relatively easy to incorporate into your food and drink and may confer quite a lot of overall benefits. Preliminary research shows that it may also be useful for treating specific health issues.

Benefits of Turmeric

Turmeric has a plethora of benefits and is an integral part of Ayurvedic medicine. Modern research has not uncovered the exact extent to which turmeric is medicinally useful, nor has it pinpointed the mechanisms by which it can aid health. It contains multiple active compounds, with the main one being curcumin. These plant compounds act in complex and interrelated ways.

Immune support: Turmeric is traditionally used to treat common colds, lung infections, throat infections, and fever. It’s often found in healthful drinks that are designed to fight off infection, alongside complementary herbs like ginger and lemon.

Upset stomach and indigestion: Turmeric is used to alleviate heartburn and treat the symptoms of indigestion. It’s also helpful to treat an upset stomach. It protects the lining of the stomach from ulcers and other damage. It also reduces gas.

Prevent heart attacks: Turmeric contains lots of curcumin, which is responsible for its bright hue. One study found that curcumin can help to lower the likelihood for heart attack, possibly due to its high content of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds.

Delay diabetes and reduce blood sugar: Curcumin can also help to delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in those with pre-diabetic symptoms. It may also decrease blood sugar levels in people who already have diabetes.

Balances mood: Curcumin may help to reduce anxiety and stabilize the mood when consumed daily.

Heal wounds: This is one of the traditional uses of turmeric, and one study in Life Sciences (September 2014) found that curcumin can help wounds heal more quickly by reducing irritation as well as oxidation.

Eases aches and pains: Turmeric is also useful when taken for joint pain. Turmeric supplements may provide some relief from knee discomfort as well as joint stiffness. It also helps loosen stiff joints. As an anti-inflammatory, turmeric has even been used to reduce symptoms of chronic inflammatory diseases like arthritis.

Prevent cancer: Preliminary studies have indicated that curcumin may help to protect cells from damage from oxidation, thus helping to reduce the risk of cancer.

Cholesterol and heart health: Turmeric helps reduce bad cholesterol (LDL) levels and prevent cholesterol build-up in the blood vessels. it can also reduce the risk of blood clots.

Are There Any Side Effects?

Turmeric usually does not cause significant side effects. Particularly when used in cooking or applied to the skin, it generally has no adverse effects. However, some people may occasionally experience stomach upset, diarrhea, nausea, or dizziness after eating a lot of turmeric.

Turmeric should not be taken in medicinal doses during pregnancy. At such a high dose, it can promote a menstrual period and/or stimulate the uterus, which would put the pregnancy at risk. However, it is safe to use it in the amounts commonly used for seasoning food.

The main compound in turmeric, curcumin, can act like the hormone estrogen. Thus, high amounts of turmeric should be avoided by those with a hormone-sensitive condition unless under the supervision of a professional.

Turmeric can also lower testosterone levels in men, decreasing sperm movement. It should be used cautiously by anyone trying to have a baby.

Turmeric can slow blood clotting, so it should not be used by those who have recently had surgery or will soon have surgery. It should also not be used by those with blood clotting or bleeding disorders.

High amounts of turmeric can also slow or prevent the absorption of iron. It should be used cautiously if you have an iron deficiency.

Lastly, those with gallbladder problems or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) should avoid high amounts of turmeric.

How to Take Turmeric

Turmeric is commonly available in most regular grocery stores. Its most common form is as a powdered spice, and it can be found in the spice aisle alongside curry and other similar spices. This powdered turmeric can be added to cooking, smoothies, juices, or tea. Turmeric is also used in sweet Indian or Asian dishes. One traditional way to consume turmeric that is now becoming trendy in the U.S. is to mix it into milk to make “golden milk.”

Turmeric is also available in the form of a standardized supplement. Capsules containing turmeric can be bought online or found in supplement stores.

Lastly, you can buy whole turmeric rhizome. This rhizome can be kept in the fridge for about a month’s worth of use. You can pickle it, infuse it, or use it to make tea.

When taking medicinal doses of turmeric, always refer to the dosing information on your supplement or powder. Consult with a doctor or herbal practitioner before consuming, since turmeric does have some possible side effects and negative indications.

Also, be aware that turmeric’s bright hue can stain skin and clothing easily. If you get it on your clothes, quickly wash the spot with soap and water to avoid the dye settling in.

What to Look For in a Good Turmeric Supplement

Turmeric can be bought whole or in the form of a powder or supplement.
If you choose to buy whole turmeric rhizome, look for an even rhizome that has a dark orange-ish color. It should be crisp and firm, and it should be free of any dark spots.

If you buy powdered turmeric, look for turmeric that is bright yellow or golden in tone. Turmeric powder has a fluffy, powdery consistency. It should have no additional ingredients.
If you buy a turmeric supplement, make sure to buy from a reputable company. They should use good manufacturing products, specify where they get their ingredients, and if possible have a Certificate of Analysis (COA) to guarantee the composition of the product.

Of course, you need to weigh the cost of the supplement against the quality and quantity of the capsules. Pay attention to the dosing information, and read over the ingredients list carefully. Any artificial colors, flavors, or preservatives should be avoided. A lengthy ingredients list is a warning sign.

No matter what form of turmeric you buy, it’s a good idea to look for an organic or naturally-grown product. Turmeric can often be wild-harvested, and should be grown without the use of artificial fertilizers and pesticides that can impact the purity of the final product.

There are pros and cons to each form of turmeric. Powdered turmeric is extremely easy to find and use. Whole turmeric rhizome is the least processed form that you can buy, and it provides a very potent taste that’s pleasant in juices and smoothies. Turmeric supplements are likely most ideal for treating specific conditions like arthritis or irritable bowels, since they provide a higher consistent dose of turmeric and curcumin.

Note: Always speak with your doctor before taking any supplements featured on this website

Check Also

Best Colostrum Supplements

10 Best Colostrum Supplements – Reviewed & Ranked for 2017

The breast milk produced immediately after pregnancy in most mammals contains a special substance called "colostrum". Rich in antibodies, it helps protect newborns from a variety of diseases by conferring passive immunity.