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Best l-Tyrosine Supplements

10 Best L-Tyrosine Supplements – Ranked & Reviewed for 2017

If you’re looking for the best l-tyrosine supplements to buy this year, then you’ve come to the right place

You can also get more info by jumping to our L-Tyrosine Supplements Guide.

Top 10 L-Tyrosine Supplements

#1 Now Foods L Tyrosine S Now Foods L-Tyrosine More Info
#2 Bulksupplements Pure L Tyrosine Powder S BulkSupplements Pure L-Tyrosine Powder More Info
#3 Thorne Research L Tyrosine S Thorne Research – L-Tyrosine More Info
#4 Nova Nutritions L Tyrosine S Nova Nutritions L-Tyrosine More Info
#5 Pure Encapsulations L Tyrosine S Pure Encapsulations – l-Tyrosine More Info
#6 Doctor's Best L Tyrosine Supplement S Doctor’s Best L-Tyrosine Supplement More Info
#7 Twinlab L Tyrosine Plus S Twinlab L-Tyrosine Plus More Info
#8 Solaray L Tyrosine Free Form Supplement S Solaray L-Tyrosine Free Form Supplement More Info
#9 Bluebonnet L Tyrosine S Bluebonnet L-Tyrosine More Info
#10 Nutricost Pure N Acetyl L Tyrosine S Nutricost Pure N-Acetyl L-Tyrosine More Info

L-Tyrosine Supplements Guide


What is L-Tyrosine?

L-Tyrosine, formally known as 4-hydroxyphenylalanine, is one of the amino acids the human body uses to produce its various proteins. It is considered to be a non-essential amino acid because the body synthesizes sufficient amounts from l-phenylalanine on its own without consuming any dietary tyrosine.

Tyrosine was first discovered in casein in 1846, but many common foods contain this amino acid. Chicken, turkey, soy, milk, cheese, and yogurt are all excellent dietary sources.

In spite of the fact that very few people are actually deficient in tyrosine, many users find that supplementation improves mood, energy, concentration, and cognition. Tyrosine’s usefulness is in its role as a precursor to the important catecholamines dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine.

These neurotransmitters are involved in the regulation of mood, alertness, and energy. Stimulants ranging from caffeine to Adderall work by increasing the concentration of these catecholamines in synapses.

The body generally produces them through a metabolic pathway that begins with l-phenylalanine. The enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase converts it into l-tyrosine, and in turn, tyrosine hydroxylase converts the l-tyrosine into L-DOPA. L-DOPA is decarboxylated to produce dopamine. Some of the dopamine is then converted into norepinephrine and epinephrine as needed.

Ordinarily, phenylalanine hydroxylase is the rate-limiting step in the body’s production of dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. Ingesting tyrosine from external sources allows the body to bypass this step, essentially shifting the rate-limiting factor from phenylalanine hydroxylase to tyrosine hydroxylase. The result is an increase in the production of dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine.

Benefits of L-Tyrosine

For the average person, tyrosine has a number of benefits similar to those of caffeine and other stimulants, but it is milder and has significantly fewer side effects by comparison. It has been shown to acutely improve subjective mood.

It is an effective workout aid, increasing endurance and reducing fatigue. Tyrosine’s main strength is its ability to mitigate deficits in mood and cognition resulting from stress. Scientists have suggested that stress inhibits the body’s ability to convert phenylalanine into tyrosine, resulting in lower levels of catecholamines. Supplemental tyrosine would theoretically be perfectly suited to combat this effect, and studies have confirmed this theory.

Several have shown that when taken before stressful situations, tyrosine improves cognition, lowers blood pressure, improves working memory, and reduces subjective feelings of stress beyond placebo. One such study tested subjects on their ability to perform match-to-sample tasks after an ambient temperature reduction from 22°C to 4°C designed to produce a physiological stress response.

Subjects given tyrosine scored higher than subjects given a placebo, but their scores were still lower than those of subjects tested at room temperature in a calm state. Furthermore, tyrosine did not improve subjects’ performance beyond the baseline at room temperature. In the average person, regular tyrosine supplementation may not provide benefits under normal conditions, but it is an excellent supplement to use as needed prior to stressful situations.

Tyrosine can also benefit people with specific health conditions. Some users see improvements in libido, and many use tyrosine as a mild antidepressant for its ability to subtly promote feelings of well-being.

There is little scientific evidence that tyrosine fights fatigue directly, although anecdotally, energy is one of the most commonly reported benefits of supplementation. Some users find tyrosine to be effective as an alternative ADHD treatment. It has fewer side effects than traditional ADHD medications like Adderall, Vyvanse, or Ritalin.

In particular, while these medications increase anxiety counterproductively in some patients, most users report a calming effect from acute tyrosine supplementation. Tyrosine also shows promise as a treatment for phenylketonuria (PKA), a disease in which the body is unable to metabolize phenylalanine, resulting in a toxic buildup of the amino acid.

Are There Any Side Effects?

The vast majority of users will not notice any side effects with tyrosine supplementation. Tyrosine undergoes several steps of metabolism to produce active catecholamines, and these steps serve as a natural buffer to prevent overdose. That said, tyrosine does interact with several other medications. Tyrosine should not be taken with MAOIs such as selegiline. MAOIs work by inhibiting the breakdown of catecholamines such as dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and the potentially problematic trace amine tyramine.

Tyrosine actually undergoes multiple metabolic pathways within the body, one of which produces small amounts of tyramine. When combined with MAOIs, the increase in tyramine can cause massive spikes in blood pressure and heart rate, which may lead to hypertensive crisis. Tyrosine may interact with stimulants that affect the release and reuptake of catecholamines, although many users stack tyrosine with caffeine without adverse effects.

People with thyroid conditions should use tyrosine with caution or avoid its use altogether. Because tyrosine is a precursor to the thyroid hormones T3 and T4, it may contribute to hyperthyroidism if taken consistently over a long period of time. Supplementation may also affect the blood levels of some thyroid medications such as levothyroxine.

Tyrosine has been shown to decrease the effectiveness of L-DOPA when the two are taken together. To maximize the effectiveness of both, they should not be taken within two hours of one another.

Tyrosine may cause stomach discomfort if too much is taken in a single dose, but this temporary issue can be remedied by decreasing the dose or taking tyrosine with food.

Occasional tyrosine supplementation is likely safe for most people, but the long-term effects of consistent use have not been studied. It is a good idea to use tyrosine in moderation.

How to Take L-Tyrosine

Each individual will have different preferences for timing and dosage of tyrosine. People who are using it as an off-label ADHD treatment will likely prefer a steady intake of small doses over the course of the day, whereas those using it for a single stressful event, such as a public presentation, will gain greater benefits from a single large dose.

Dosage recommendations vary widely and will be dependent on personal preference. The lowest commonly recommended single dose is 500 mg, and the highest is 5 grams. Taking up to 12 grams in a single day has been found to be safe, but most people prefer a daily dose in the range of 1 to 5 grams. New users should start small and slowly increase the dose to optimize its effects.

If taking tyrosine to mitigate the negative effects of an acute stressor, the supplement should be taken 30-60 minutes prior to the predicted onset of stress. Many users report significantly stronger effects when tyrosine is taken on an empty stomach. Tyrosine is not a central nervous system stimulant, but some find that it interferes with sleep quality or causes insomnia. To avoid these effects, do not take tyrosine less than 4 hours prior to sleep.

Some people who don’t respond to standard l-tyrosine have better results with its acetylated form, N-Acetyl-L-Tyrosine (NALT). The method of action of NALT is not fully understood. Theoretically, it has a lower bioavailability than l-tyrosine, but a large number of users report significantly stronger effects from NALT, even at lower doses. Typical doses of NALT are in the range of 300 to 600 mg. It can be used interchangeably with l-tyrosine based on personal preference.

What to Look For in a Good L-Tyrosine Supplement

There are several options when choosing a tyrosine supplement. Ready-made capsules or pills are easier to use and do not require a scale to measure the correct dose. Before purchasing a bottle, make sure that there is no ambiguity about the amount of tyrosine in each capsule. Most providers also list any ingredients included as filler.

Buying tyrosine in bulk powder form has the advantage of being cheaper, and filler will rarely be included. Responsible bulk vendors are open about their sources and are usually willing to provide purity statistics about individual batches. It is a good idea to choose the most transparent vendors, and always aim for the highest level of purity in the product.

Note: Always speak with your doctor before taking any supplements featured on this website. This article has not been written, reviewed or endorsed by a medical professional and may not be used to diagnose or treat any medical conditions.